Refrain From Using Rupee Font For New Rupee Symbol

New Rupee Symbol

I saw this news article in today’s Times of India and was surprised to see such an article in a national daily.  This company Foradian Technologies is mis-leading people by coming up with a font for the new Rupee Symbol. They have designed a font that can represent the symbol (`) as the Rupee symbol.  That’s not how a currency symbol should be represented.  It should be a Unicode symbol and should get approved by Unicode Consortium first.  Dollar ($), Euro (€), Yen (¥), Pound (£) are all Unicode characters and not just fonts. This company –  Foradian Technologies – is simply trying to gain some mileage of this hype created around the new Rupee Symbol.  This is just a marketing gimmick to get the company in lime-light.

It is getting worse day by day.  More and more people companies are coming up with new fonts every hour.  Please refrain from using this font from such companies/people.

Actually there is already a Unicode symbol for INR registered.  The Unicode for this symbol is U+20A8. Probably we need to replace this existing symbol with the new one.  That would be the best way to introduce our new rupee symbol and it will also make sure that existing documents which are using the old symbol will automatically upgraded to the new one.

Let’s do it the right way.

Author: Ronak Gandhi

I’m a software developer, who is also passionate about driving, traveling, automobiles, photography, computers and games. TT (Ping Pong as some people say) is the latest entry to my list of hobbies. I’m slowly getting better, but not there yet.

16 thoughts on “Refrain From Using Rupee Font For New Rupee Symbol”

  1. I have downloaded the font, and am using it in any document that I PDF before sending out. Makes sense to me, because my work is such that I used $ and € in most of my documents in addition to Rs., and much prefer using the symbol than INR.

    BUT, that doesn’t take away from the fact that till it gets a UNICODE, it doesn’t gain universal acceptance. All that the company has done is to make it easier for people to use the symbol (if not for them, I would probably have sized down a bitmap and pasted it in my documents).

  2. Raju here has introduced a font which encodes the symbol at U+20A8. So if you use his font, documents sent to others or posted to the web will retain the symbol and at worst degrade to the old symbol of “Rs”.

  3. Ronak, I agree with you. The Foradian font is a good thing to demonstrate how it looks in a document, but the encoding is wrong. It sacrifices document integrity and forward-compatibility because when people use a different font, they will see ` instead of the Rupee symbol! For the folks who’re clueless, does the $, €, £ or ¥ need a special font to be viewed correctly? Do these currency signs revert to ` or @ or some such symbol when a different font is used? Foradian should make a small fix to their font by mapping the ` keystroke to U+20A8.

  4. Efforts of Foradian for making this program should be appreciated.We can wait for unocode number.Foradian is a promising venture by some young engineers.

      1. Get your facts right, gentleman.
        Foradian dint make any program. What they did was just editing a font (Which has only Latin chars and not even a single Indic language) and replacing the “grave accent” character with the new rupee symbol. Trust me when I say; anyone can do this and it just doesn’t deserve such media hype.

        Here is the full map of Foradian’s font. See it yourself
        http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_Kshzxq7JtSc/TEjdtTRx8PI/AAAAAAAACGM/Q0TTRJZCVgg/s1600/Screenshot.png

        Edited: Its not tilda, it is “grave accent”

  5. what a cry baby…can’t do yourself anything and keep critisizing others who work….Grow up..appreciate..

    we are’nt using it for official work..but want it as to celebrate this new achivement of the nation…

    1. My only concern is this is NOT the RIGHT way to do it. Have you seen the other symbols ($, €, ¥, £) implemented as fonts? No. They are proper Unicode symbols. Do you expect people from other countries to download the font and then open any document, email etc? Do you do that when you open a European web-site with their currency symbols? You should grow up and do the things right way instead of doing them the way you benefit from it.

      1. Ronak,
        define ‘right’ way? When we want to do something new, it’ll be a different way. Why dont the ansi and europeans have all indic fonts in products they sell? why only english and european languages? do you think that is the ‘right’ way? right is for us to decide. If it’ll take a long time for unicode to adopt it, i see no harm in using a custom font to support it natively. In fact, I hope india and other asian countries ditch the american and european standards for everything! lets have our own standards and we can start in any way we feel is ‘right’ 🙂

        1. Amol, let me answer your queries one by one.

          > Why dont the ansi and europeans have all indic fonts in products they sell? why only english and european languages?

          That’s a plain business decision they are making. It doesn’t make sense to support an Indian language in a product because the return on that investment is close to zero. However, most of the mainstream products nowadays have support for most of Indian languages.

          > If it’ll take a long time for unicode to adopt it, i see no harm in using a custom font to support it natively. In fact, I hope india and other asian countries ditch the american and european standards for everything!

          When you say Unicode adopt our languages, it is not right. Because we are also part of Unicode. The Government of India (Department of Information and Technology) is also a member of Unicode Consortium. The Society for National Language Technology Research is also a member. Check out this link – http://www.unicode.org/consortium/memblogo.html.

          And for your kind information, Unicode does support most of Indian scripts – http://www.unicode.org/standard/supported.html.

          So it is up to the member of Unicode Consortium to get the new Rupee Symbol adopted as soon as possible.

      2. Ronak,
        Your comments are well taken. I think font vs unicode are 2 separate issues. Whether Indian govt. pushes for it or not, whether and when unicode accepts it or not, – does not matter because its very easy to make a font and use it. and thats the best solution till a standardized item is there on the menu. ITs like USB 3.0 – its now a industry standard, with hard drives supporting it, but Intel doesnt natively support it in their chipset (for whatever business decision). but there are laptops using NEC’s usb 3.0 adapater – now would you advocate that no one should build laptops with usb 3.0 support until intel builds native support? the adapter from nec is like the font here – does the job period!

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